Romerías

Seville enchants

The Hacienda de Torrijos was not originally intended to be a religious building. Its past as an ancient Moorish military fortress is evidenced by the presence of walls and towers. The hacienda is considered a cultural asset. 

Commonly known as the Chapel of Jesus the Nazarene, it was part of the Dominican convent of Saint Bartholomew, funded by Bartolomé López de Marchena. The convent, which was founded in 1542, was dedicated to the care and well-being of the body and spirit. The chapel was built in the 17th century and underwent extensive renovations in the second half of the 18th century. 

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

Utrera’s Chapel of Our Lady of Carmen belongs to the Salesian School, the oldest of the congregation in Spain (1881).

The Jesuits came to Utrera and founded a convent with a school. The Rodrigo Caro School stands now on that site. All that remains is this church, known as St Francis the New, the sacristy and the meeting room.

Typical Sevillian manor house from the first half of the 19th century, donated by the Counts of Gomara to the Hermanas de la Cruz (Sisters of the Cross) in 1941 for the order's convent.
It has a neoclassical style façade, vestibule and central courtyard with marble columns.

This is a rectangular church with a wooden coffered ceiling and a gabled roof. Inside you can find two altarpieces, one of which is presided over by the 18th century image of the Candelera and the other by San Bartolomé (18th century). Among the canvases, there is a Pietà, from the 17th century, and San Cristóbal Crucificado (Saint Christopher Crucified), from the 18th century.