Écija Palacio Peñaflor

Seville enchants

Commonly known as the Chapel of Jesus the Nazarene, it was part of the Dominican convent of Saint Bartholomew, funded by Bartolomé López de Marchena. The convent, which was founded in 1542, was dedicated to the care and well-being of the body and spirit. The chapel was built in the 17th century and underwent extensive renovations in the second half of the 18th century. 

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

The Jesuits came to Utrera and founded a convent with a school. The Rodrigo Caro School stands now on that site. All that remains is this church, known as St Francis the New, the sacristy and the meeting room.

The Barefoot Carmelite Convent of the Conception was founded in 1577 by Francisco Álvarez de Bohórquez and his wife, Catalina de Coria. The convent was opened in 1580.

The Palace of San Telmo was built in 1682 to house the Seminary College of the University of Mareantes. In 1849 it became the residence of the Dukes of Montpensier, who completed the north tower and built the entrance to the hallway, the east wing and the ballroom.

It has been governed by the Capuchin Franciscans since its inauguration in 1724. Its church is baroque. The interior, which forms a Latin cross plan, is very richly decorated, characteristic of the Baroque period of the second half of the 18th century, with great sumptuousness and a profusion of decorative pieces, which contrasts with the austerity of the nuns.

This is one of the many Gothic-Mudejar churches that were built within the town walls during the 14th century, although this is one of the churches that was most reformed and extended in the following centuries, especially between the 16th and 19th centuries.