San Nicolás del Puerto Puente de Piedra

Seville enchants

“The Roman legacy in Seville” is a journey through the traces of Rome’s passage through the city and its province, which shows the visitor all the Monumental and Artistic Heritage that we treasure of this civilisation that once colonised and directed the known world.

“The Roman legacy in Seville” is a journey through the traces of Rome’s passage through the city and its province, which shows the visitor all the Monumental and Artistic Heritage that we treasure of this civilisation that once colonised and directed the known world.

“The Roman legacy in Seville” is a journey through the traces of Rome’s passage through the city and its province, which shows the visitor all the Monumental and Artistic Heritage that we treasure of this civilisation that once colonised and directed the known world.

The Mulva-Munigua Archaeological Site is listed as a Site of Cultural Interest (BIC). It is located near Villanueva del Río y Minas, an area of mining tradition in the foothills of the Sierra Morena (Seville).

The first phase of construction of the Metropol Parasol revealed visible remains of much of the Roman period, from Tiberius (circa 30 AD) to the 6th century, as well as an Islamic Almohad house from the 12th and 13th centuries.

Las Setas de Sevilla, also known as the Metropol Parasol project, executed by architect Jürgen Mayer, is the largest wooden structure in the world. 

Like other parishes in Seville, its origin dates back to the Reconquest of the town. It is located on the same site as a Roman temple, on which a Visigothic church and later a mosque were built. It is a Gothic-Mudejar type of church, although it was modified during the 17th and 18th centuries.