Castillo de Alcalá de Guadaíra

Seville enchants

“The Roman legacy in Seville” is a journey through the traces of Rome’s passage through the city and its province, which shows the visitor all the Monumental and Artistic Heritage that we treasure of this civilisation that once colonised and directed the known world.

“The Roman legacy in Seville” is a journey through the traces of Rome’s passage through the city and its province, which shows the visitor all the Monumental and Artistic Heritage that we treasure of this civilisation that once colonised and directed the known world.

“The Roman legacy in Seville” is a journey through the traces of Rome’s passage through the city and its province, which shows the visitor all the Monumental and Artistic Heritage that we treasure of this civilisation that once colonised and directed the known world.

Like other parishes in Seville, its origin dates back to the Reconquest of the town. It is located on the same site as a Roman temple, on which a Visigothic church and later a mosque were built. It is a Gothic-Mudejar type of church, although it was modified during the 17th and 18th centuries.

The Cerro del Hierro information point is in a public area of about 360 hectares, where the Cerro del Hierro was declared a Natural Monument on 1 October 2003.

Part of the Roman villa of Osset Iulia Constantia, specifically several walls that could have belonged to a storage structure next to a wall that was built in San Juan and that was a strategic control point of the trade between Híspalis and the Aljarafe, was discovered in this municipality during the works of the Seville metro.

The Shrine is an 18th-century building attached to a Roman-era tomb excavated in the rock. Located in Blancaflor Street, it consists of a cave tomb, which serves as a chapel, a small anteroom and a graceful bell gable. The chapel is dedicated to San Críspulo and San Restituto.