Romerías

Seville enchants

These beautiful manor houses, with extraordinary architectural and historical value, were built during the Baroque period. They are scattered across the city on different streets.

Commonly known as the Chapel of Jesus the Nazarene, it was part of the Dominican convent of Saint Bartholomew, funded by Bartolomé López de Marchena. The convent, which was founded in 1542, was dedicated to the care and well-being of the body and spirit. The chapel was built in the 17th century and underwent extensive renovations in the second half of the 18th century. 

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

Utrera’s Chapel of Our Lady of Carmen belongs to the Salesian School, the oldest of the congregation in Spain (1881).

The Jesuits came to Utrera and founded a convent with a school. The Rodrigo Caro School stands now on that site. All that remains is this church, known as St Francis the New, the sacristy and the meeting room.

The Sanctuary dates back to the early 16th century when Antonio Barrados obtained permission to build a chapel dedicated to Our Lady of Consolation. The titular image was gifted by the Nuestra Señora de la Antigua Convent. On 31 March 1561, the chapel was transferred to the congregation of Minimal Fathers. The construction of the convent and church began at that time.

Santiago is profoundly linked to Utrera’s origin as a city. The original church that stood opposite the Castle was the heart of present-day Utrera. According to the chronicles, the primitive church of Santiago was looted in the second half of the 14th century by Mohamed V of Granada.