Écija Palacio Peñaflor

Seville enchants

Commonly known as the Chapel of Jesus the Nazarene, it was part of the Dominican convent of Saint Bartholomew, funded by Bartolomé López de Marchena. The convent, which was founded in 1542, was dedicated to the care and well-being of the body and spirit. The chapel was built in the 17th century and underwent extensive renovations in the second half of the 18th century. 

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

Utrera’s Chapel of Our Lady of Carmen belongs to the Salesian School, the oldest of the congregation in Spain (1881).

The Jesuits came to Utrera and founded a convent with a school. The Rodrigo Caro School stands now on that site. All that remains is this church, known as St Francis the New, the sacristy and the meeting room.

This building has been classified as an Asset of Cultural Interest since 1995. In the early 18th century, Archbishop Luis de Salcedo y Azcona decided to build a palace on top of the pre-existing building. Apparently, the new building was almost totally destroyed in a fire that occurred on 27 February 1792.

It has been governed by the Capuchin Franciscans since its inauguration in 1724. Its church is baroque. The interior, which forms a Latin cross plan, is very richly decorated, characteristic of the Baroque period of the second half of the 18th century, with great sumptuousness and a profusion of decorative pieces, which contrasts with the austerity of the nuns.

The Church of San Nicolás de Bari was one of the parishes founded after the reconquest by Ferdinand III of Castile in 1248. It was originally Gothic-Mudejar and in the 18th century it would be rebuilt as a baroque building.