Castillo de Alcalá de Guadaíra

Seville enchants

Doñana stretches across a vast plain between Seville and the Atlantic Ocean. Sun, air, water and mud are the protagonists for hundreds of kilometres around this enormous and uninhabited geological basin, the history of an Andalusia eroded, transported and sedimented here over millions of years.

The purpose of this guide is to provide a useful tool to enjoy this area of Seville, a jewel of Europe and a paradise for nature and birdwatching lovers.

This Special Conservation Area (SCA) covers some 4,772 ha, mostly in the province of Seville. This site features prominently in the Andalusian Natura 2000 network owing to its special importance for the conservation of riparian habitats, certain fish species included in the Habitats Directive and, in general, the river ecosystem and the connectivity it provides as an ecological corridor.

We will start the route on Avenida Dr. Fleming in Las Cabezas de San Juan until we reach a roundabout. We will have to turn right on Calle Blas Infante. After 100 metres we come to a crossroads where we must continue straight on along the Avenida de Jesús Nazareno, where we leave Las Cabezas and take the SE-5208 road.

This natural enclave is one of the most important in Europe. It is an extremely important wintering, migratory and breeding area for many bird species. Furthermore, it is one of the last havens for endangered wildlife species such as the Imperial eagle or the Iberian lynx.

The Brazo del Este was one of the two branches into which the lower section of the River Guadalquivir was divided. In the marshland plain, The River Guadalquivir splits into several branches when it reaches the marsh plains. The three largest branches were the Brazo del Este, Enmedio, which is the current watercourse, and Torre, also known as the Northwest Branch.

This natural enclave is one of the most important in Europe. It is an extremely important wintering, migratory and breeding area for many bird species. Furthermore, it is one of the last havens for endangered wildlife species such as the Imperial eagle or the Iberian lynx.