Castillo de Alcalá de Guadaíra

Seville enchants

Commonly known as the Chapel of Jesus the Nazarene, it was part of the Dominican convent of Saint Bartholomew, funded by Bartolomé López de Marchena. The convent, which was founded in 1542, was dedicated to the care and well-being of the body and spirit. The chapel was built in the 17th century and underwent extensive renovations in the second half of the 18th century. 

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

Utrera’s Chapel of Our Lady of Carmen belongs to the Salesian School, the oldest of the congregation in Spain (1881).

The Jesuits came to Utrera and founded a convent with a school. The Rodrigo Caro School stands now on that site. All that remains is this church, known as St Francis the New, the sacristy and the meeting room.

The Barefoot Carmelite Convent of the Conception was founded in 1577 by Francisco Álvarez de Bohórquez and his wife, Catalina de Coria. The convent was opened in 1580.

The San Vicente Mártir Parish Church was built between 1703 and 1711 on the former site of a church and hospital. The building was paid by Francisco José de la Plata y Ovando, a knight of the Order of Saint John of Jerusalem and “Comendador” of Tocina.

Like other parishes in Seville, its origin dates back to the Reconquest of the town. It is located on the same site as a Roman temple, on which a Visigothic church and later a mosque were built. It is a Gothic-Mudejar type of church, although it was modified during the 17th and 18th centuries.