Feria

Seville, beautiful and diverse

Since 1998, the cultural managers Rosana de Aza and Olinto de la Obra, forerunners in the promotion and dissemination of the artistic and cultural heritage of Al-Andalus, have been working to encourage the history of the most traditional flamenco and to promote the folkloric tradition of Andalusia, a World Heritage Site.

La Casa de la Guitarra is a Flamenco Cultural Centre located in an 18th century house in the heart of the Barrio de Santa Cruz (former Jewish quarter), a few steps away from the Cathedral. It is run by José Luis Postigo, a famous artist and guitarist who has won two national flamenco guitar awards (Córdoba National Prize and Jerez de la Frontera National Prize of the Chair of Flamencology).

Built in 1884 by the Algarin brothers, it divided the Castle’s original courtyard in two. 

This roofed courtyard was built around a well with cast-iron columns surrounded by two storeys of houses. The Duke of Medinaceli sold the Castle to the Algarín brothers in the 11th century, who used it as an oil mill. 

Of this old mansion belonging to one of the most noble families of Ecija only the doorway remains. According to records, during the second quarter of the 18th century, the master builders Lucas Bazán and Pedro Lozano de la Torre took part in the refurbishment works commmissioned by the 4th Marquis of Alcantara del Cuervo, Don Manuel de Villavicencio y Castrillo, in his main houses.

On 5 October 1862 a group of craftsmen from Ecija, in a meeting at the San Francisco Schools, agreed to approve a regulation that would govern a Casino Society, named Society of Craftsmen, thus creating the Craftsmen's Casino.

The origins of these gardens go back to the reign of Al-Mutamid, famous monarch of the Taifa kingdom of Seville, and their name comes from the lagoon that was located there, "al-buhayra", where he would place a series of recreational gardens that later on and under the mandate of Abu Yacub Yusuf would be extended with thousands of olive trees, vineyards, fruit trees and palm trees.

In this planet, with two-thirds of it occupied by seas and oceans, shipping has served as a bridge between cultures, making our world a better known place.