Romerías

Seville enchants

The brothers Serafín (1871-1938) and Joaquín (1873-1944) Álvarez Quintero were born in Utrera, where they lived their childhood years.

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

On 3 February 1945 (eight days before his death), Amalio himself set up the Foundation, registered under number A34-SE19, with its headquarters at number 7, Plaza de Doña Elvira in Seville, in the heart of the Santa Cruz district, which had been the painter's studio. 

The Seville Town Hall, one of the best examples of Plateresque architecture, was a gift from King Charles V to the town in response to his desire to give Seville the status of a great city that it deserved.

This wonderful Franciscan Third Order chapel, adjacent to the church of San Pedro de Alcántara, is located on Cervantes Street in Seville.

This Shrine is dedicated to the image of Osuna’s patron saint, Saint Arcadius, who is taken in procession through the city every year on 12 January. The 17th-century church was renovated in the 18th century. The single nave shrine is covered by a barrel vault and the transept with a dome on pendentives.

The church was built in the 18th century. It contains images and canvases from the 17th and 18th centuries. 

The church has a Latin cross floor plan with three naves in three sections, a transept, a chancel and chapels on either side. The naves are separated by semicircular arches supported by white limestone Tuscan columns.