San Nicolás del Puerto Puente de Piedra

Seville enchants

The brothers Serafín (1871-1938) and Joaquín (1873-1944) Álvarez Quintero were born in Utrera, where they lived their childhood years.

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

Founded as a "Museum of Paintings" in 1835, it opened in 1841 with works from confiscated convents and monasteries, occupying the former Convent of La Merced Calzada, founded by San Pedro Nolasco after the conquest of Seville in 1248.

It is the only temple in Seville that preserves the remains of the three religions. Later, by privilege of King Alfonso X (1252), it became a synagogue and was consecrated as a Christian temple in 1391.

It began to be built as a manor house in the 16th century. It originally belonged to the Paiba family and later to the Counts of Corbos and the Counts of Miraflores. It was in 1901 when it became the property of Regla Manjón Mergelina, the Countess of Lebrija, who carried out a restoration and fitted it out to house antiques.

The Seville Town Hall, one of the best examples of Plateresque architecture, was a gift from King Charles V to the town in response to his desire to give Seville the status of a great city that it deserved.

This wonderful Franciscan Third Order chapel, adjacent to the church of San Pedro de Alcántara, is located on Cervantes Street in Seville.