Chaparro de la Vega

Seville, beautiful and diverse

This 19th-century neoclassical church was built over an earlier 14th-century temple (Shrine to Our Lady of Solitude), demolished in 1800 by the Count of Altamira. The church has a rectangular plan, a central nave and two aisles. The central nave, which is larger than the aisles, is covered with barrel vaults and the aisles with groin vaults.

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

The Barefoot Carmelite Convent of the Conception was founded in 1577 by Francisco Álvarez de Bohórquez and his wife, Catalina de Coria. The convent was opened in 1580.

The church of Nuestra Señora de Consolación, patron saint of Umbrete, is one of the best examples of the Sevillian architecture known as "popular baroque", as opposed to the "cultured baroque" style used by the main Andalusian architects during the 17th century.

Built on a former mosque, its construction features show that it is part of the large group of Gothic-Mudejar churches in Seville. In this case, it is a temple that has been greatly transformed both internally and externally by the various extensions carried out over the centuries.

This church combines the Islamic building tradition with the Gothic art provided by the Christian conquerors who came from Castile. The main façade dates back to the second half of the 13th century, with an exceptional stone doorway made up of a pointed arch with archivolts and battens.

This is one of the many Gothic-Mudejar churches that were built within the town walls during the 14th century, although this is one of the churches that was most reformed and extended in the following centuries, especially between the 16th and 19th centuries.