Feria

Seville, beautiful and diverse

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

Built on a former mosque, its construction features show that it is part of the large group of Gothic-Mudejar churches in Seville. In this case, it is a temple that has been greatly transformed both internally and externally by the various extensions carried out over the centuries.

This church combines the Islamic building tradition with the Gothic art provided by the Christian conquerors who came from Castile. The main façade dates back to the second half of the 13th century, with an exceptional stone doorway made up of a pointed arch with archivolts and battens.

This is one of the many Gothic-Mudejar churches that were built within the town walls during the 14th century, although this is one of the churches that was most reformed and extended in the following centuries, especially between the 16th and 19th centuries.

The Church of San Nicolás de Bari was one of the parishes founded after the reconquest by Ferdinand III of Castile in 1248. It was originally Gothic-Mudejar and in the 18th century it would be rebuilt as a baroque building.

It dates from the 14th century and is made in Gothic-Mudejar style. It was built on top of an old mosque with three naves with an apse, two ogival stone portals from the early 15th century and an 18th century tower with a bell tower. It had to be rebuilt after the damage suffered by the Lisbon earthquake in 1755.

The convent of Santa Isabel was founded in 1490 by Ms Isabel de León and was the headquarters of the Order of Saint John.

The origin of this order dates back to the 11th century, with the foundation of the Order of Malta, when the nuns helped pilgrims and the sick in hospitals.