Romerías

Seville enchants

The Shrine to Saint Barbara is located on Villanueva del Río y Minas’ Guadalquivir Street, north of the town centre and Corta San Fernando. It is a simple chapel with a cross plan built in 1944. 

This 19th-century neoclassical church was built over an earlier 14th-century temple (Shrine to Our Lady of Solitude), demolished in 1800 by the Count of Altamira. The church has a rectangular plan, a central nave and two aisles. The central nave, which is larger than the aisles, is covered with barrel vaults and the aisles with groin vaults.

Commonly known as the Chapel of Jesus the Nazarene, it was part of the Dominican convent of Saint Bartholomew, funded by Bartolomé López de Marchena. The convent, which was founded in 1542, was dedicated to the care and well-being of the body and spirit. The chapel was built in the 17th century and underwent extensive renovations in the second half of the 18th century. 

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

Utrera’s Chapel of Our Lady of Carmen belongs to the Salesian School, the oldest of the congregation in Spain (1881).

The Jesuits came to Utrera and founded a convent with a school. The Rodrigo Caro School stands now on that site. All that remains is this church, known as St Francis the New, the sacristy and the meeting room.

The Barefoot Carmelite Convent of the Conception was founded in 1577 by Francisco Álvarez de Bohórquez and his wife, Catalina de Coria. The convent was opened in 1580.